ProofThatBlog

Grammar Giggle – Can We Bring Our Tobacco/E-Cigs and Pets or Not?

ProofThatBlog

This was in our local newspaper for our Hometown 4th of July Celebration. This is a great example of how important proofreading for content is. It isn’t always misspellings or misplaced commas that draw the wrong kind of attention to your writing, but unclear writing will do it too.

Grammar Giggle – My Kind of Wine Glass!

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I saw this in a catalog I received. While I would definitely use the second one for wine, since the page before uses the same description on a typical wine glass, I’m just saying that someone missed this in the review.

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Grammar Giggle – Interesting Entree Choice

ProofThatBlog

A friend sent this one to me and it recently appeared on Reddit, but I thought it was interesting to show that even if everything is spelled correctly, sometimes placement is an issue. You need to try to look at your writing as a whole to make sure that all the parts of it are correct. Follow.

Grammar Giggle – Obvious Phishing Emails

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I received this email recently. Obviously, when the header has multiple errors, it is not from Chase bank. Also obviously, the link in the email is NOT to Chase.com. I know that because I hovered over the link to see where the link went and it was a string of letters and numbers.

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Ask PTB: Three Slashes

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I had a reader ask “Question: When formatting a pleading, what is the /// called at the bottom of the page? What are the rules?” ” After some research, here’s what I find: It is usually called a “slash” (or in this example, three slashes).

Grammar Giggle – None Of Those Things ARE Allowed

ProofThatBlog

This Grammar Giggle is notice that sometimes I screw things up too. One of the Proof That Blog readers commented that there was an error in my last Grammar Giggle– Can We Bring Our Tobacco/E-Cigs and Pets or Not? –because I made a mistake in this comment: The reader was correct. It should have been “none of those things ARE allowed.”

Grammar Giggle – I’ll Explain This Best To My Ability!

ProofThatBlog

This was in a local breaking news post I received. I initially caught the “best to their ability” error–which should be “to the best of their ability”–and noticed that the last part of the last sentence could be rewritten to make much more sense.

Grammar Giggle – Less or Fewer?

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This was a picture in a Facebook group I’m in that made me stop and look again. It gives me the opportunity to discuss the difference between less and fewer. Less is something that can’t necessarily be counted such as “Jane wished there was less hate in the world.”

Grammar Giggle – Visor Issues

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A friend sent me a part of this description she saw while looking for a sun visor. I checked and was able to find the full ad and there were so many errors.

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Grammar Giggle – Accessaries

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This was on a box in a package I received from something I had ordered on Amazon.

Grammar Giggle – Hiring Serveres

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I took this picture at a recent restaurant visit. I forgive the missing “i” in “Hiring” only because it looks like it slid down to the line below and the “h” is about to follow, but the misspelled version of “Servers” is too much for me.

Apostrophe Decision Chart

ProofThatBlog

After a recent Proof That blog post about apostrophes and plurals, I had someone ask the question about words that end in “s” and how you make those words possessive.

Grammar Giggle – You’ll Should Treat Yourself!

ProofThatBlog

A reader sent this from an email that she had received from Thesaurus.com. It looks like they drafted the language as something like “you’ll want to treat yourself” and went in to change it to “you should treat yourself” but missed one of the edits to make that happen.

A Master's Guide to B2B: How Listening to Your Customers Can Grow Your Business

Speaker: Adam Dorfman, Head of Product Growth at Reputation & Michele Bettinazzi, Customer Experience Manager at PeakMade Real Estate

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Grammar Giggle – Montlhy Parking

ProofThatBlog

Here is another picture from my recent trip to Chicago. This is a great example of knowing what it is supposed to say and not actually seeing what it says and also not reading all the way through something. Follow.

Grammar Giggle – Alcohol Consumption May Make You Use The Wrong “You’re”

ProofThatBlog

A friend sent this to me. They got it correct in one place, but not in another on the same sign. Perhaps they were out of the letter “e” or perhaps they just weren’t paying attention. In this sign, both should be “you’re,” the contraction for “you are.”

Ask PTB – Capitalizing id.

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A reader recently asked if the abbreviation “id.” ” should be italicized and should the “I” be capitalized or not? Photo by Marcin Skalij on Unsplash. According to The Bluebook , id. is always italicized (including the period).

Grammar Giggle – Apostrophes and Plurals

ProofThatBlog

This example illustrates my pet peeve–using apostrophes to make a word plural. This was in our local Motor Vehicle Division office where I was renewing my driver’s license. They used the apostrophe incorrectly not once, but twice!

Negative Reviews & Online Feedback Happens - But Where Do You Go From Here?

Speaker: Adam Dorfman, Head of Product Growth at Reputation and Jeremy Shubitz, Director of Marketing at Bosley

Responding to online negative feedback can be challenging. What should you say? What should you not say? Should you even respond? In today's, your customers will be not only your biggest advocates but also your biggest critics. However, negative feedback can offer actionable insights to build a stronger product and customer experience.

Grammar Giggle – Employee Appreciate Day

ProofThatBlog

This was in my email recently. It was correct in one place, but incorrect in the subject line of the email—which is where your reader looks first. It’s the same in a business letter, the subject line is more important than many believe. Always read that as you’re proofing your letter or email.

Grammar Giggle – Slow Down And Get It Right

ProofThatBlog

I think news outlets are the worst at trying to get news headlines out quickly so they can beat their competition to it, but that sometimes leads to mistakes that shouldn’t be made.

Grammar Giggle – At Least They Safely Preformed Maintenance!

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I received this in a letter from my local utility company who was scheduled to do some work in my neighborhood. Again, “preform” is actually a word and not something that spell check will catch, but I’m pretty sure they meant “perform” maintenance.

Grammar Giggle – Specfic Stats?

ProofThatBlog

This was an ad I recently received in the mail. It looks to me like this is an example of your brain knowing what it is supposed to say and tricking your eyes into seeing it that way. It might be better to have someone else look at it before it goes to press.

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Grammar Giggles – Aye, Aye, Captian!

ProofThatBlog

I found this at a restaurant while on vacation. While it sounds delicious, I couldn’t get past the title—which contained TWO errors. Follow. The post Grammar Giggles – Aye, Aye, Captian! appeared first on Proof That Blog.

Grammar Giggle – What Kind of Dog?

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My daughter-in-law sent me this from one of the Facebook pages she follows. Obviously, it is a correctly spelled word, just an incorrectly used word. Follow. The post Grammar Giggle – What Kind of Dog? appeared first on Proof That Blog.

Grammar Giggle – Back Legs Only

ProofThatBlog

This picture is an example of too much information. It seems that since chickens only have back legs–I think the front “legs” are called “wings”–this language is unnecessary and confusing.

Grammar Giggle – Furnuture

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My son sent this picture to me. One of the most important words on the item is misspelled. That could be very bad for business. Think about a Google search. How could it come up when you search for “furniture”? Just another reason spelling matters! Follow.

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Grammar Giggle – We Recieve Another Incorrect Receive

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Twice in one week I’ve now seen this same error. This time it is in my Microsoft Outlook email. While the fact that my inbox is full will surprise no one who knows me, I’m not sure why it is so difficult for a company like Microsoft to spell “receive” correctly. Follow.

Grammar Giggle – NFL News

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A local newspaper was apparently so intent on getting news out about rumors of a possible NFL trade that they forgot to read the news story. Here is just one paragraph of that story that I found three errors in–and I’m not even a real football fan! Follow.

Grammar Giggle – Easy To Assemble, But Difficult To Read

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A friend sent me these assembly instructions for a desk she purchased. I assume the manufacturer’s first language is not English, but instructions on something you are selling in the United States are kind of important and they should take more care with translations.

Grammar Giggle – Happy Monther’s Day!

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A friend sent this to me and then I saw it over and over again in Facebook ads–always spelled this way. My friend wondered if the editor of the ad had trouble with their own mother and wasn’t sure if it should be “Monster” or “Mother,” so they combined it. Follow.

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