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Grammar Giggle – Interesting Entree Choice

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A friend sent this one to me and it recently appeared on Reddit, but I thought it was interesting to show that even if everything is spelled correctly, sometimes placement is an issue. You need to try to look at your writing as a whole to make sure that all the parts of it are correct. Follow.

Grammar Giggle – Visor Issues

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A friend sent me a part of this description she saw while looking for a sun visor. I checked and was able to find the full ad and there were so many errors.

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Grammar Giggle – No, You’re Nuts!

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I saw this sign recently on a TikTok and couldn’t resist. This is a very common error. Just remember that “your” is something belonging to YOU, while “you’re” is a contraction for YOU ARE.

Grammar Giggle – NFL News

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A local newspaper was apparently so intent on getting news out about rumors of a possible NFL trade that they forgot to read the news story. Here is just one paragraph of that story that I found three errors in–and I’m not even a real football fan! Follow.

Building a 5-Star Online Reputation for Your Business

Speaker: Brent Werbeck, GetMoreReviews Co-Founder

Trying to figure out how to turn your happy customer’s comments into 5 star reviews may seem like a daunting task. From internal feedback to Google reviews, what is "really" the way to go? Join Brent Werbeck, Co-Founder of Get More Reviews, in this discussion of how to foster and grow your business's 5-star online reputation.

Grammar Giggle – Happy Monther’s Day!

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A friend sent this to me and then I saw it over and over again in Facebook ads–always spelled this way. My friend wondered if the editor of the ad had trouble with their own mother and wasn’t sure if it should be “Monster” or “Mother,” so they combined it. Follow.

REPLAY – Happy National Proofreading Day!

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Now THIS is my favorite holiday of the year! It’s a chance for me to once again extol the virtues of the importance of proofreading. In fact, I wrote a blog post about how important proofreading is to law offices here.

Grammar Giggle – Alcohol Consumption May Make You Use The Wrong “You’re”

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A friend sent this to me. They got it correct in one place, but not in another on the same sign. Perhaps they were out of the letter “e” or perhaps they just weren’t paying attention. In this sign, both should be “you’re,” the contraction for “you are.”

Grammar Giggle – Apostrophes and Plurals

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This example illustrates my pet peeve–using apostrophes to make a word plural. This was in our local Motor Vehicle Division office where I was renewing my driver’s license. They used the apostrophe incorrectly not once, but twice!

Grammar Giggle – Random Comma

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I saw this while on the internet recently (and on a site that should know better). The comma is unnecessary and makes this difficult to read. Follow. The post Grammar Giggle – Random Comma appeared first on Proof That Blog.

Process Serving Made Easy: Serve in All 50 States Using One Platform

Speaker: PROOF

PROOF has revolutionized service of process. Using our online platform, create serve requests nationwide and receive live updates with mapped verification of each attempt. PROOF’s technology provides users with complete transparency from start to finish.

Grammar Giggle – Can I Get Criminalized Onions With That?

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My daughter sent this to me from her local grocery store. It just makes me laugh–especially working in the legal field.

Grammar Giggle – Accessaries

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This was on a box in a package I received from something I had ordered on Amazon.

Grammar Giggle – Envelop/Envelope

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A reader sent this one to me. It took some researching for me to confirm that the warm water would “envelop” your body.

Grammar Giggle – I’ll Explain This Best To My Ability!

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This was in a local breaking news post I received. I initially caught the “best to their ability” error–which should be “to the best of their ability”–and noticed that the last part of the last sentence could be rewritten to make much more sense.

Wills, Trusts, and Estates: The Essentials of Wealth Management

Speaker: Vi Pham, Attorney at Law

Wealth management is a guaranteed practice: as paralegals, it's essential that you know the complexities of wealth management in order to ensure that your client's rights are protected to their fullest extent. Join Vi Pham, Attorney and educator, in this exclusive webinar that will leave you feeling brushed up and ready. This seminar meets the requirements of the NALA Certifying Board for continuing legal education credit required to maintain the CP (Certified Paralegal) credential.

Grammar Giggle – Employee Appreciate Day

ProofThatBlog

This was in my email recently. It was correct in one place, but incorrect in the subject line of the email—which is where your reader looks first. It’s the same in a business letter, the subject line is more important than many believe. Always read that as you’re proofing your letter or email.

Do All Titles Require a Period?

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A friend recently emailed me asking if the rules for the use of “Mr.” ” had changed so that it did not require a period. I thought it was kind of a no-brainer and of course it needed the period. However, researching the topic shows me that I was wrong–kind of.

Grammar Giggle – Less or Fewer?

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This was a picture in a Facebook group I’m in that made me stop and look again. It gives me the opportunity to discuss the difference between less and fewer. Less is something that can’t necessarily be counted such as “Jane wished there was less hate in the world.”

Grammar Giggle – Before Or After?

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I saw this online in a breaking news alert for a local television station.

Ask PTB – Capitalizing id.

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A reader recently asked if the abbreviation “id.” ” should be italicized and should the “I” be capitalized or not? Photo by Marcin Skalij on Unsplash. According to The Bluebook , id. is always italicized (including the period).

Grammar Giggle – Easy To Assemble, But Difficult To Read

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A friend sent me these assembly instructions for a desk she purchased. I assume the manufacturer’s first language is not English, but instructions on something you are selling in the United States are kind of important and they should take more care with translations.

Grammar Giggle – Principal/Principle

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I saw this on a bank website. One would think that a bank is typically talking about money when they are talking about “principal.” ” In this case, they were. They even got it right twice but then, they didn’t. Follow.

Apostrophe Decision Chart

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After a recent Proof That blog post about apostrophes and plurals, I had someone ask the question about words that end in “s” and how you make those words possessive.

Grammar Giggle – Slow Down And Get It Right

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I think news outlets are the worst at trying to get news headlines out quickly so they can beat their competition to it, but that sometimes leads to mistakes that shouldn’t be made.

Grammar Giggle – Furnuture

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My son sent this picture to me. One of the most important words on the item is misspelled. That could be very bad for business. Think about a Google search. How could it come up when you search for “furniture”? Just another reason spelling matters! Follow.

Grammar Giggle – “Recieve” High Praise When You Spell Receive Correctly

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I found this typo on one of our state government pages. Although “receive” is spelled correctly in two places in the same paragraph, the first one is obviously wrong. It does take some time to read through what you’ve written but avoiding these kinds of errors is worth it. Follow.

Grammar Giggle – Hot Mess Memories – Part 2

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After I posted the original Grammar Giggle on this photo , I had several people comment that I had missed some errors. I don’t always point out all of the errors–both to give the author some credit and so it doesn’t overwhelm the reader and make it seem worse than it really is.

Grammar Giggle – Unites States of America

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I am not sharing this example to start any kind of political discussion and any political comment will be deleted. The purpose is to show another example of spell check doing its job and checking how words are SPELLED–just not PROOFREADING and checking for content.

Grammar Giggle – He Was Throwing What?

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This popped up on a local news program on my phone. I’m still not sure what was thrown at the employees. Was it mice or was it knives? Proofreading involves reading ALL of the writing and making sure it all makes sense together.

Grammar Giggle – Hot Mess Memories

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My brother sent this to me from a local newspaper remembering a drive-in theatre in Mesa. “It’s” is one of those words that does not follow the normal possession rules. The only time to use “it’s” is as a contraction of “it is.”

Capitol or Capital?

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With all the recent and upcoming activity in our nation’s capital, it’s important that if you’re commenting on it, it is spelled correctly.

Grammar Giggle – Pease Pay More Attention!

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I snapped this picture over the holidays at a local drive-through restaurant. The first, “day,” is singular yet they list several days. The second, “pease,” is obviously meant to be “please.”

Grammar Giggle – We Recieve Another Incorrect Receive

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Twice in one week I’ve now seen this same error. This time it is in my Microsoft Outlook email. While the fact that my inbox is full will surprise no one who knows me, I’m not sure why it is so difficult for a company like Microsoft to spell “receive” correctly. Follow.

Grammar Giggle – Back Legs Only

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This picture is an example of too much information. It seems that since chickens only have back legs–I think the front “legs” are called “wings”–this language is unnecessary and confusing.

Grammar Giggles – How Many Days Does January Have?

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I received this in response to an email I sent out. I realize that 2020 messed with our heads, but there are still only 31 days in January in 2021. It is important to review your out of office email after you type it to make sure it reads the way you want it to. Follow.

Grammar Giggle – What Kind of Dog?

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My daughter-in-law sent me this from one of the Facebook pages she follows. Obviously, it is a correctly spelled word, just an incorrectly used word. Follow. The post Grammar Giggle – What Kind of Dog? appeared first on Proof That Blog.